Another salvo in the changing battlefield of publishing shows that innovative and tech-saavy authors can win an audience and eventually a publisher. This article titled “Podcasting Your Novel: Publishing’s Next Wave?” reports on a fast growing trend that I have known about for a while.

I am addicted to audiobooks. If not for them I would never walk the dogs or go to the gym. I discovered Podiobooks when they first came on the scene. In the beginning there wasn’t a lot of selection, mostly scifi and some of that pretty awful. As they grew in public awareness they drew new authors too and began to post more books in many genres, and some of them really good. All of them were by novice authors, or authors completely unknown to me. Most probably never published traditionally.

Two authors really stood out though, J.C. Hutchins with 7th Son and Scott Sigler with Infected and Earthcore. J.C. Hutchins in particular produced an audio drama that rivaled anything Hollywood might produce, and a darned good thriller. All for free. Why give it away? Well, read the article. These two have a loyal “listenership” and now are on the bestseller list for real money. Kudos and congrats to them both.

Incidentally on the article the writer asserts that the audience is/was mostly young male scifi geeks. I’m not sure that was true, after all I’m an older woman. I’ve listened to books on tape on car trips and when walking or exercising for years and years. By the way you can also listen to many many old books that are now in the public domain also for free on Librivox. These books are recorded by volunteers so the perfomance quality varies, but it’s painless way to catch up on those classics of literature you’ve always meant to read.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think the audiobook will completely supplant the ink and paper book anytime soon… at least I hope not. But, I am in favor of authors getting their work out there and finding an audience. It’s a moment of change, and change can be scary. It will all shake out in time and anything that helps authors and readers connect can’t be bad.

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premiodardo_awardAccording to Todd, who bestowed the pass along award on me, the award “Dardos” appreciates the merits – culturally, literary and individually – of every blogger who expresses him/herself on his/her blog.

Thanks, again, to everyone who reads this blog and comments. I appreciate it!

Now then, the rules of Premio Dardos:
1. be tickled pink 😉
2. copy and paste the award picture to your blog
3. write down the regulations
4. link the blog who bestowed you the Award
5. and finally nominate 15 blogs for the Award

Here are fifteen blogs that I definitely think deserve this award in no particular order:

1. Carolyn Hayes Uber — Publisher; she’s my sis as well as my boss, but it really is an informative blog!

2. Vegas Confidential — If you like Vegas, his blog has the latest gossip.

3. Bark Like a Fish, Dammit! — Ursula V. A very talented young artist and author, and she’s just funny as hell.

4. The Dark Salon — Alexandra Sokoloff, writer who is posting some wonderful “how to write” articles.

5. This Side of Paradise — Geoff Schutt is blogging a literary novel one post at a time.

6. Today’s Inspiration — Leif Peng posts beautiful mid-twentieth century editorial and advertising art—fabulous!

7. Drawn! is a multi-author blog devoted to illustration, art, cartooning and drawing.

8. Neil Gaiman’s Journal — OK, I’m a fan girl, what can I say.

9. Red Pen Girl — Freelance editor, and friend Jami Carpenter.

10. Geotripper — The blog of my cuz the “rock doc” geology professor, Garry Hayes.

11. Geoff Schmuacher — One of the most well-read guys I have the pleasure to know. An author, editor, publisher, and news guy.

13. Nathan Bransford — A literary agent. His blog, is fun to read.

14.The Writing Show — Paula B. is going on hiatus? Well, there still some reading (and listening here.)

15. The Murverse —The blog that goes with Mur Lafferty’s I Should be Writing Podcast.

Wow, coming up with 15 was harder than I thought!

And … no, I have no clue what it means.

Cory Doctorow is a well-known, and celebrated young sci-fi author. I don’t know if it’s comforting to know that writers we admire, and who are successfully churning out great work — and regularly — also struggle with the same time issues and distraction problems that we amateurs do.  (Internet.)

Doctorow has some good advice for dealing with distractions in this article in Locus Magazine.

Does anybody use LibraryThing? Well, I know over 500,000 people are signed up, but does anybody here reading this use it? I signed up as a user back in July of 07, and then promptly forgot about it. The idea of entering all my books manually just seemed overwhelming. But now I see that they have a $15 barcode reader that allows you to scan your books and upload them all at once. You can get a widget for your blog that shows your random covers (if they are linked on Amazon, or if you uploaded them). Though I think it links TO Amazon to buy the book, still I am all in favor of helping writers sell books in whatever way they can.

I does have some interesting tools and lists of use to writers, publishers, and readers. For instance, you can see the top 25 books, based on users uploads; read reviews and post your own reviews; connect with authors and other users. You can find bookstores in your area that stock a book you want—independent ones too.

There are lots of book centric blogs there, many based on genre or category. I browsed through a YA blog and the comments and posts seemed to be from teachers and librarians (as well as the occasional actual YA). Seeing what this demographic thinks is pretty enlightening.

So, now I’m thinking about getting that scanner, and uploading my books. This could take a while as I have hundreds, perhaps thousands. What do you all think? Is this yet another way to waste time and procrastinate? Check out Library Thing before you answer…

Here’s where I’ll be tonight: http: Vegas Valley Book Festival Keynote address. Have I pimped this enough yet? Later on a party… photographic evidence coming later.