I haven’t blogged about design in a long time. Here are a couple of good design blogs I’ve just run across. First i Love typography is a blog about typography! It’s lovely, simple clean and a great source for font ideas and design ideas also. This guy knows his fonts! Play the font game! (I’m in the “hall of fame.”)

designAnd this one webdesignerdepot. Lots of good articles on webdesign like this one about blog design. Lots of great design links too.

premiodardo_awardAccording to Todd, who bestowed the pass along award on me, the award “Dardos” appreciates the merits – culturally, literary and individually – of every blogger who expresses him/herself on his/her blog.

Thanks, again, to everyone who reads this blog and comments. I appreciate it!

Now then, the rules of Premio Dardos:
1. be tickled pink 😉
2. copy and paste the award picture to your blog
3. write down the regulations
4. link the blog who bestowed you the Award
5. and finally nominate 15 blogs for the Award

Here are fifteen blogs that I definitely think deserve this award in no particular order:

1. Carolyn Hayes Uber — Publisher; she’s my sis as well as my boss, but it really is an informative blog!

2. Vegas Confidential — If you like Vegas, his blog has the latest gossip.

3. Bark Like a Fish, Dammit! — Ursula V. A very talented young artist and author, and she’s just funny as hell.

4. The Dark Salon — Alexandra Sokoloff, writer who is posting some wonderful “how to write” articles.

5. This Side of Paradise — Geoff Schutt is blogging a literary novel one post at a time.

6. Today’s Inspiration — Leif Peng posts beautiful mid-twentieth century editorial and advertising art—fabulous!

7. Drawn! is a multi-author blog devoted to illustration, art, cartooning and drawing.

8. Neil Gaiman’s Journal — OK, I’m a fan girl, what can I say.

9. Red Pen Girl — Freelance editor, and friend Jami Carpenter.

10. Geotripper — The blog of my cuz the “rock doc” geology professor, Garry Hayes.

11. Geoff Schmuacher — One of the most well-read guys I have the pleasure to know. An author, editor, publisher, and news guy.

13. Nathan Bransford — A literary agent. His blog, is fun to read.

14.The Writing Show — Paula B. is going on hiatus? Well, there still some reading (and listening here.)

15. The Murverse —The blog that goes with Mur Lafferty’s I Should be Writing Podcast.

Wow, coming up with 15 was harder than I thought!

And … no, I have no clue what it means.

Cory Doctorow is a well-known, and celebrated young sci-fi author. I don’t know if it’s comforting to know that writers we admire, and who are successfully churning out great work — and regularly — also struggle with the same time issues and distraction problems that we amateurs do.  (Internet.)

Doctorow has some good advice for dealing with distractions in this article in Locus Magazine.

OK, THIS is pretty funny: http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200901u/reblock-yourself

Hmm, I posted this with BlogIt from Facebook and it posted it 6 times! Yikes. Plus you can’t tag or categorize the posts. Not so useful, that.

I just read in PW about a new comic book based on the “missed connections” ads you see on Craigslist and in the newspapers. Curious, I just looked at some of those ads on Craigslist. Some are hilarious, some are poignant, some are like poetry. Like this one here. Line breaks are mine the words are totally his(?).

You know what everyone else sees,
and if you don’t,
I totally
overestimated you.

You know what chance you have…
now.
I don’t mind staying
‘Good Friends’
if that’s what you want.
The thing is,
you tolerate me too
and I’d say
that’s
a great place to start.

Does anybody use LibraryThing? Well, I know over 500,000 people are signed up, but does anybody here reading this use it? I signed up as a user back in July of 07, and then promptly forgot about it. The idea of entering all my books manually just seemed overwhelming. But now I see that they have a $15 barcode reader that allows you to scan your books and upload them all at once. You can get a widget for your blog that shows your random covers (if they are linked on Amazon, or if you uploaded them). Though I think it links TO Amazon to buy the book, still I am all in favor of helping writers sell books in whatever way they can.

I does have some interesting tools and lists of use to writers, publishers, and readers. For instance, you can see the top 25 books, based on users uploads; read reviews and post your own reviews; connect with authors and other users. You can find bookstores in your area that stock a book you want—independent ones too.

There are lots of book centric blogs there, many based on genre or category. I browsed through a YA blog and the comments and posts seemed to be from teachers and librarians (as well as the occasional actual YA). Seeing what this demographic thinks is pretty enlightening.

So, now I’m thinking about getting that scanner, and uploading my books. This could take a while as I have hundreds, perhaps thousands. What do you all think? Is this yet another way to waste time and procrastinate? Check out Library Thing before you answer…

So no post in a while. Busy, busy. I am writing a YA novel in my spare time and it got me to thinking about epilogues and prologues. I have written a prologue to my story and I wonder what readers think about such things? For my story I think it sets the scene and tells something about the main characters. However, it’s not vital to the story. I haven’t thought as far out as an epilogue yet!

Sometimes epilogues add something vital, or wrap up a nagging loose end that wasn’t completely tied up in the ending scenes. This seems fairly common especially in thrillers, and sometimes in historical fiction. I for one thought the epilogue added at the end of the last Harry Potter book was utterly unnecessary and frankly, dumb. But I gather JK Rowling felt compelled to set all those “shippers” straight about who ends up with who, etc.

In Tolkein’s LOTR trilogy the final, final, final scenes in the Shire were cut from the movies, and the Return of the King could have ended with the crowning of Aragorn and the hommage to the four little guys and I would’ve have been very happy and balling my eyes out. But no, it went on, and on, and on … and on. Purists, forgive me, but really they poured the treacle on a bit heavy.

So I’m curious. Do you like epilogues or prologues? Or would you rather the writer just did a bang up job of ending the story on the right satifying note … you don’t want to know what happened next, or maybe you want it in the sequel? Prologues? Do they slow down the story? Should the author just plunk you down in the world he/she is creating and get on with it? (This is an excuse to try the polling widget. So please try it!)